Concurrent Sessions

Concurrent sessions will be held Thursday, September 29 through Saturday, October 1.

Note for speakers: If you are a speaker at the ASCE 2016 Convention, please visit our For Speakers page for full preparation instructions.

Back to Program

Thursday, September 29

Calculating Your Professional Risk(s): The fewer moving parts, the better (Professional Development)
(1.0 PDH)

Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 10:30 - 11:30 a.m.

This presentation is about contract basics for engineers. The presentation will explain the various components of contracts with actual examples from real contracts taken from cases that resulted in litigation or arbitration. Engineers will explore the necessary elements of a contract, the importance of defining the scope of their services, how indemnity clauses and limitation of liability clauses may be used and their consequences, and the implications of insurance requirements in contracts. For example, the presentation will address the outer limits of indemnity clauses by reviewing anti-indemnity statutes, which bar parties to construction contracts from transferring liability resulting from their sole negligence to others. The presentation will also explain the difference between a limitations of liability clause, which is generally enforceable in the construction context, and an exculpatory clause, which may not be enforceable in a construction context.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the elements of a contract – offer, acceptance, and consideration.
  • Identify indemnity clauses and how they can be used to make the engineer or his client responsible for liabilities that they would not normally have.
  • Identify and understand at least three common limitation of liability clauses found in construction contracts; and Understand the importance of complying with insurance requirements in construction contracts.

Presenter: Sarah Johnson, Partner, Karbal, Cohen, Economou, Silk & Dunne, LLC

Operating the Columbia River Basin Reservoirs Post - 2024 (Multi-Discipline Technical)
(1.0 PDH)

Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 10:30 - 11:30 a.m.

This presentation will describe how the Columbia River Treaty provisions influence the operation of Columbia Basin reservoirs post-2024, and the state-of-the-art flood risk assessment tools developed to evaluate reservoir operating scenarios using basin-wide, event-based models including Monte Carlo sampling of parameters within the Hydrologic Engineering Center’s Watershed Analysis Tool (HEC-WAT).

Learning Objectives:

  • Understanding the main provisions included in the Columbia River Treaty.
  • Understanding how the Treaty affects reservoir operations in the basin.
  • Identify changes in the Treaty provisions post-2024 and how they affect flood risk management within the Columbia River System.

Presenters: Northwest Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; Peter Dickerson; Daniela Todesco, P.E., M.ASCE, Columbia Basin Water Management

Building the Grand Coulee Dam (History & Heritage)
(1.0 PDH)

Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 10:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Harnessing the water potential of the mighty Columbia River was essential to the growth of the United States in the early 20th century. Extraordinary people, machines, and methods were essential to the successful construction of the dam. This presentation will highlight how this civil engineering wonder was built.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the challenges of designing and building Grand Coulee Dam.
  • Describe the means and methods used for construction Identify lessons from Grand Coulee Dam.
  • Identify lessons from Grand Coulee Dam.

Moderator: Dave Gilbert, P.E., F.ASCE, Retired
Presenter: Raymond Paul Giroux, Dist.M.ASCE, Kiewit

USACE $10.7B Korea Relocation Program (Significant Projects)
(1.0 PDH)

Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 10:30 - 11:30 a.m.

The Korea Relocation Program is a $10.7 billion construction mega-project; the largest in DOD history; executed by USACE. The scope expands USAG Humphreys by 300% total acreage; 17.6M cm of engineered fill; and 592 miles of underground utilities. Lessons learned, innovation, planning, design and processes will be presented in a comprehensive session.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the 3 different types of contracts used to execute the Camp Humphreys expansion.
  • Identify the reality of construction phasing on the current status of the project.
  • Identify the impact of quality related delays on the schedule and budget of the project.

Presenter: Brandon Toliver, P.E., S.M.ASCE, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

A Roadmap to Reintroduce Research into the Civil Engineering Profession (Strategic Issues/Public Policy)
(1.0 PDH)

Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 10:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Issues such as sustainability, climate change and scarcity no longer allow our profession to use yesterday’s solutions to solve tomorrow’s problems. What’s needed now is an industry-wide effort to lift research and innovation to a level that will continue to provide a rewarding career in civil engineering in the future.

Learning Objectives:

  • How to engage in research and the positive impacts that research can have on the profession.
  • Tangible evidence will be presented to show how investment in research can provide a lasting and beneficial improvement to the profession.
  • Why the profession needs a paradigm shift away from “maintaining the profession” to “advancing the profession” and why this is of the utmost importance.

Presenters: Ron Klemencic, P.E., S.E., Hon.AIA, Chairman and CEO, Magnusson Klemencic Associates; Rik Kunnath, President, Charles Pankow Foundation; Mark Perniconi, P.E., ASCE., M.ACI, M.DBIA, Executive Director, Charles Pankow Foundation

Engineering Community Resilience through Public Policy (Natural & Man-Made Disaster)
(1.5 PDHs)

Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 2:00 - 3:30 p.m.

This moderated panel discussion, the first in a series over the next five years, addresses the issue of natural Hazards Risk and Resilience Policy. Speakers will present examples of how risk can be reduced and community resilience improved through proper development and implementation of public policy.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about the Oregon Resiliency Plan and how state policy is being modified to promote resiliency.
  • Learn how public agencies have included resiliency in planning future projects.
  • Attendees will be able to describe policy changes and identify the benefits for policy decisions for increasing the resilience of at-risk structures.

Moderator: Vilas Mujumdar, D.P.D., P.E., S.E., F.SEI, Dist.M.ASCE, Consultant
Presenters: Michael Harryman, Oregon State Resiliency Officer; Richard Steinbrugge, Beaverton School District; Michael Stuhr, Director, Portland Water Bureau; Jay Wilson, Clackamas County Resilience Coordinator

Barakah Nuclear Power Plant Project (BNPP), UAE (Significant Projects)
(1.5 PDHs)

Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 2:00 - 3:30 p.m.

BNPP is currently the largest nuclear construction project across the world with four identical APR1400 units under simultaneous construction, an estimated cost of $25 billion. This session will present approaches to project planning, feasibility, site selection, licensing, prime contractor and regulator interaction, engineering management and national and international stakeholder coordination.

Learning Objectives:

  • Present adopted approaches and lessons learned to successfully plan, finance and deliver mega projects that are first of a kind in the countries that do not have existing civil nuclear energy programs.
  • To develop new capabilities to undertake such major projects.

Presenters: Suresh Parashar, Ph.D.,P.E., M.ASCE, Head of Geotechnical Engineering, CH2M; Henry Berry; Jassim Dawood; Timothy Abney

Drones Right Now: Putting a UAV to Work (State of the Industry/Profession)
(1.5 PDHs)

Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 2:00 - 3:30 p.m.

Unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs or drones) are quickly integrating into engineering projects from mapping to maintenance inspections to construction monitoring. As a result, the FAA and states are acting quickly to evolve regulations and give guidance on the uses of this exciting new technology. Hear from engineers using UAVs in three sectors and government officials who are setting the path to future use.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand existing UAV technology, including platforms, sensors, mission planning software and processing tools as well as how to analyze the resulting images, video and 3D models to determine which inspection requirements are satisfied (and which ones are not satisfied).
  • Review UAV-based case studies, imagery, and video for 3 specific UAV inspections for infrastructure projects: bridge, electrical, and dam.
  • Understand the evolving regulations and steps to begin using UAVs directly.

Moderator: Brian Pallasch, Aff.M.ASCE, Director of Government Relations, ASCE
Presenters: Shelley Hughes; Barritt Lovelace, Staff Engineer, Howard R. Green Co.; Otto J. Lynch, P.E., F.SEI, F.ASCE, Vice President, Power Line Systems, Inc; Wes Oliphant, P.E., F.SEI, F.ASCE, M.IEEE, M.AWS, M.NACE, Principal, Chief Technical Officer, ReliaPOLE Inspection Services Company/Advanced Aerial Inspection Resources

Engineering Optimal Financial, Social, and Environmental Returns (Multi-Discipline Technical)
(1.5 PDHs)

Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 2:00 - 3:30 p.m.

As projects get more complex, engineers must adjust to new paradigms. Federal funding, best value based procurements, and community sustainability and resilience requirements increase the need for decisions based on Cost-Benefit, LCCA, and TBL Analysis. Practical and accessible economic tools help engineers deliver value and compelling business cases to varied stakeholders.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn 3 ways in which civil engineers have engaged in economic analysis as part of project development.
  • Understand the applicability of 3 different types of economic assessment (Cost-Benefit/Life Cycle/TBL Analysis in project development).
  • Examine ways to objectively “tune” projects at 3 different stages of project development (planning, design, and operations) to produce optimal financial, social and environmental returns.

Presenters: Marty Janowitz, ENV SP, MES, Vice President Sustainable Development, Stantec; Kevin Shepherd, P.E., EVN SP, Founding Principal, VERDUNITY; John F. Williams, RLA, ENV SP, FSA LVL 1, Chairman & CEO, Impact Infrastructure, Inc.

Making Cities Resilient with Green Infrastructure
(1.5 PDHs)

Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 2:00 - 3:00 p.m.

This session reviews the benefits of “green infrastructure” by exploring what it is and how it impacts a city’s prosperity, resilience, climate, watershed, and environmental footprint.  The panelists explore design and management principles as well as the role of policy through real world examples from Atlanta, GA, and Portland, OR.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand what constitutes “green infrastructure” and identify the key ecosystems services they provide for our cities.
  • Understand the types of environmental threats faced by cities and the central role stormwater management plays in city resilience.
  • Understand the financial implications of resilience for cities, the role green infrastructure plays in city resilience, and the way cities can incentivize private developments to include green infrastructure.
  • Learn specific green infrastructure strategies used by cities to prepare for and respond to the risks that come with climate change.

Moderator: Osvaldo Gonzalez, LEED AP BD+C, Associate AIA, Global Sustainability Director, Energy & Industrial Division, CH2M

Presenters: Mark Anderson; Cory Rayburn, Aff.M.ASCE, Construction Project Manager, Atlanta Government; Andrea Saven

CE Magazine Presents Concealed Threat

Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 2:00 - 3:30 p.m.

Aggressive corrosion concealed from inspection and testing can lead to dramatic failures with no warning, and subsequent expensive and disruptive repairs. This presentation examines two such failures of significant bridge elements: 1) external post-tensioned tendon ruptures in Sarasota, Florida and 2) H-pile buckling and downward pier movement in Green Bay, Wisconsin.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify contributing factors to aggressive corrosion at each bridge.
  • Identify the corrosion mechanism at each bridge.
  • Identify potential monitoring solutions.

Presenter: Michael Ahern, P.E., M.ASCE, Principal, Pivot Engineers

#GameChangers: Innovative Projects Changing Infrastructure (Strategic Issues/Public Policy)
(1.5 PDHs)

Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 4:00 - 5:30 p.m.

ASCE’s new #GameChangers report highlights the innovation and replicable trend across the U.S. from water to energy to transit. Join #GameChangers project owners to hear the ideas and solutions to change the infrastructure and engineering game using technology, sustainability, and cost savings.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify innovative projects in the Water, Energy and Transportation, and Freight Industries.
  • Assess potential innovative trends in the practice of engineering.
  • Recognize the changing practices in project analysis, design and delivery.

Presenters: Jenny Baker, Senior Restoration Manager, The Nature Conservancy; Mark Jockers, Government & Public Affairs Manager, Clean Water Services of Hillsboro, OR; Otto J. Lynch, P.E., F.SEI, F.ASCE, Vice President, Power Line Systems, Inc.

Remember, Restore, Reconnect - Columbia River Highway at 100 (History & Heritage)
(1.5 PDHs)

Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 4:00 - 5:30 p.m.

Oregon’s Columbia River Highway is the first scenic highway in the United States. The Secretary of the Interior designated it a National Historic Landmark in 2000 because the road set the standard a century ago for others to follow in designing scenic highways, including those in the national parks.

Learning Objective:

  • Participants will come away from this session with a very good understanding about the road’s history and engineering significance, its restoration, and the reconnection work that will make it a world-class tourist destination.

Moderator: Reuben F. Hull, Jr., P.E., M.ASCE, PMP, Design Project Manager M+W Group
Presenters: Robert Hadlow, Ph.D., Senior Restorian, Department of Transportation; Jeanette Kloos; Mark Libby, P.E., M.ASCE, Bridge Program Manager, HDR Engineering, Inc.; Kristen Stallman, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Department of Transportation

Effective Preparation and Testimony as an Engineering Professional (Professional Development)
(1.5 PDHs)

Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 4:00 - 5:30 p.m.

Litigation in connection with engineering projects and services continues to be on the rise. Preparation is crucial to successfully offering deposition and/or trial testimony. This presentation will provide guidance in the areas of what makes a credible witness, preparing opinions, writing and defending your expert report, file management, and strategic deposition/trial preparation.

Learning Objectives:

  • Preparing your resume for scrutiny.
  • Preparing your opinions and defending your report or work product.
  • Strategic tips to effective testimony associated with technical matters.

Presenters: Nicholas Albergo, P.E., D.WRE, F.ASCE, Senior Engineer, GHD

ASCE/SEI Assessment of the Chile Earthquake of 2010 (Natural & Man-Made Disasters)
(1.5 PDHs)

Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 4:00 - 5:30 p.m.

SEI sent reconnaissance teams to Chile after the February 27, 2010 magnitude (Mw) 8.8 earthquake to gather information useful to code development. Presentations will be made by members of the SEI Chile Assessment Team discussing their observations from this natural disaster based on the assessment reports produced by the teams.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about the performance of building structures designed to modern building codes and nonbuilding structures designed to modern industry standards subjected to a magnitude 8.8 earthquake
  • Understand the research programs initiated from the assessment teams observations.
  • Learn about the performance on nonbuilding structures not similar to buildings designed to modern industry standards.

Presenters: Robert Bachman, P.E., S.E., M.ASCE, Senior Principal, Robert E. Bachman, Consulting Engineers; John Hooper, P.E., S.E., F.SEI, F.ASCE, Senior Principal/ Director of Earthquake Engineering, Magnusson, Klemencic Associates; John Silva, P.E., S.E., M.ASCE, Director Codes and Standards, Hilti Inc.; J.G. (Greg) Soules, P.E., S.E., P.Eng., SECB, F.SEI, F.ASCE, Principal Engineer, CB&I Inc.

Engineering with Point Clouds / Delivering Projects in a Digital World (State of the Industry/Profession)
(1.5 PDHs)

Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 4:00 - 5:30 p.m.

In 2004 the National Institute of Science and Technology reported that the time and cost wasted delivering projects with traditional documents is 40% of 60% of all engineering in project delivery, or almost $16 billion per year in the United States alone.  In 2012 the House Subcommittee on Highways and Transit included language in the $100B MAP-21 legislation that required the federal government to promote and encourage the delivery of transportation projects using digital data.  In 2013 the ASCE Construction Institute created a Digital Project Delivery Committee to begin studying this new method of practice.  The first presentation will focus on how one type of increasingly common digital deliverable, highly precise "point clouds" created with laser scanners, have revolutionized design work for existing buildings.  The second presentation will cover the broader concepts of delivering capital projects in a digital environment, as well as lessons learned from mega-projects where these innovations have been put to use.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand fundamental principles of laser scanning technology.
  • Understand applications and limitations of current laser scanning practices.
  • Extract information accurately from laser scans.
  • Integrate laser scans effectively into design workflows with BIM.

Presenters: Danny Kahler, P.E., M.ASCE, Principal, Kahler Engineering; David Odeh, P.E., S.E., SECB, F.SEI, F.ASCE, Principal, Odeh Engineers Inc.; Michael Scancarello, EIT, A.M.ASCE, Odeh Engineers Inc.

A Business Perspective on the Raise the Bar Initiative (Strategic Issues/Public Policy)

Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 4:00 - 5:30 p.m.

The engineer of tomorrow will need to be better prepared to face complex challenges, as envisioned by the Raise the Bar initiative. At the same time, the firms of tomorrow will need to adapt to new client demands for more efficient delivery systems. The decades-old employee model, top heavy with PEs, may need to give way to a more profitable model led by innovative engineer leaders and a medical-office-like hierarchy of skilled employees working under them.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify how tomorrow’s civil engineering firms will benefit from this initiative, utilizing engineers with an enhanced body of knowledge to provide projects that are more efficient while protecting public safety and enhancing public welfare.
  • Explore ideas about how the traditional model of the engineering team could evolve, with greater emphasis on well-defined roles for better performance and cost-effectiveness—a professional engineer as the team leader with support from other licensed engineers, graduate engineers, engineering technologists and engineering technicians.
  • Describe the civil engineering accreditation process, and how colleges of engineering will modify their focus to provide the enhanced learning demanded by future engineers.

Moderator: Blaine D. Leonard, P.E., D.GE, Pres.10.ASCE, Chair of AASHTO Connected Vehicle Working Group
Presenters: Brad Aldrich, P.E., FNSPE, F.ASCE, President, Aldrich + Elliott, PC; Eric Flicker, P.E., L.S., M.ASCE, Senior Consultant, Pennoni Associates, Inc.


 

Friday, September 30

Guidance for Disaster Resilience Planning (Natural & Man Made Disasters)
(1.5 PDHs)

Friday, September 30, 2016 - 10:15 - 11:45 a.m.

The implementation of the NIST (National Institute of Standards & Technology) Community Resilience Planning Guide for Buildings and Infrastructure Systems and associated programs is reviewed, including applications in communities, development of Guide briefs, the Community Resilience Panel of stakeholders, and the NIST-sponsored Center of Excellence at Colorado State University.

Learning Objectives:

  • An understanding of the NIST Community Resilience Guide as illustrated by Pilot Communities.
  • Specific suggestions for how to start and implement the six-step process in any community.
  • An understanding of where researchers and professional engineers can engage in the process.
  • An introduction to tools under development that will assist communities in resilience planning.

Moderator: Christopher D. Poland, P.E., S.E., F.SEI, M.ASCE, Consulting Engineer
Presenters: Stephen Cauffman, Research Engineer, National Institute of Standards & Technology; David Mizzen, EIT, A.M.ASCE, Staff Engineer/Scientist, ARA; Jay Raskin, FAIA, A.M.ASCE, Associate, Salus Resilience; John Van De Lindt, Ph.D., F.ASCE, Professor, Colorado State University

The Only Constant is Change (State of the Industry/Profession)
(1.5 PDHs)

Friday, September 30, 2016 - 10:15 - 11:45 a.m.

The world is becoming increasingly connected and our partners and competition are requiring that we take a fresh look at how we approach every aspect of our business. Whether it is doing more with less or doing it with new partners with different approaches to life it is incumbent upon us to be able to change with the times and continuously look to see how we can improve what we do – both to remain competitive in our increasingly global business and to make the best possible use of ever more limited resources.

Learning Objectives:

  • How to apply lean production techniques to standard engineering processes so that firms can to do more with less.
  • Provide a methodology that can help ease the problems associated with working with fewer available staff.
  • Specific techniques to improve performance, including tips on how best to learn from other cultural approaches to our work.
  • How all of this can be applied to continuously strengthen our industry and ensure that we remain globally competitive.

Presenters: Ken Fredrickson, P.E., CCM, DBIA, Director, Berg & Associates; Marlon Vogt, P.E., F.SEI, Senior Engineer, Ulteig Engineers

Outstanding National Civil Engineers Biographies (History & Heritage)
(1.5 PDHs)

Friday, September 30, 2016 - 10:15 - 11:45 a.m.

This ASCE history and heritage session will feature biographies of outstanding, nationally known civil engineers: “Frank T. Crowe: Builder of Western Dams,” “John Frank Stevens: A Civil Pioneer,” “Careers of ASCE Presidents and Founders: James P. Kirkwood, Alfred W. Craven, and Julius W. Adams.”

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn and understand the background and experience of outstanding national civil engineers.
  • View outstanding civil engineering case study projects.
  • Review the leadership skills and innovations of outstanding civil engineers.

Moderator: Theodore N. Green, P.E., M.ASCE, Project Manager
Presenters: Erik Metzger, A.M.ASCE, Chief of Transportation, VHB; Jerry Rogers, Ph.D., P.E., D.WRE, Dist.M.ASCE, Retired Professor Emeritus – University of Houston; J. David Rogers, Ph.D., P.E., F.ASCE, Chair of Geological Engineering, Missouri University

Behind the Scenes: Design and Construction of the World's Longest Floating Bridge (Significant Projects)
(1.5 PDHs)

Friday, September 30, 2016 - 10:15 - 11:45 a.m.

Washington State Government (WSDOT) recently opened the world's longest floating bridge as part of the $4.56 billion SR 520 program in Seattle's metropolitan area. This program features new bridges and highway lanes from I-5 to I-405, enhancing regional safety and mobility. We'll highlight our accomplishments in engineering, construction, public involvement, and program management.

Learning Objective:

  • Learn about complex planning, coordination and permitting process.

Presenters: Ethan Bancroft; David Becher, P.E., Manager Floating Bridge & Landings, Washington State Government; Larry Kyle, P.E., Senior Vice President, SR 520 Program Engineering Manager/ GEC Manager, HDR Engineering, Inc. ; Julie Meredith, P.E., SR 520 Program Administrator, Washington State Department of Transportation

Challenges of Replacement and/or Rehabilitation of Local Bridges (Multi-Discipline Technical)
(1.5 PDHs)

Friday, September 30, 2016 - 10:15 - 11:45 a.m.

This session will focus on replacement (Dungeness Railroad Trestle) and renovation (Historic Bascule) of two bridges. The first half of the session will focus on removal of a damaged exiting trestle and design and construction of a $2.2 million replacement trail bridge in 8 months, owned by the S’Klallam Tribe over the Dungeness River, located near Sequim, WA. The second half will focus on a case study including initial condition assessment and preliminary design focused on the full rehabilitation of a historic double leaf bascule movable bridge over a U.S. Coast Guard navigable waterway known as Islais Creek located in San Francisco, CA.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn the basics of structurally balancing a historic movable bridge and its effects on the bridge mechanical and electrical equipment.
  • Learn how sea level rise and other environmental constraints are integrated into the rehabilitation of a historic movable bridge in the State of California.
  • How a $2 million bridge project can be designed, permitted and constructed in an 8-month period through cooperative interaction.
  • Demonstrate how bridge foundations can be designed and constructed to withstand substantial lateral avulsions of a river channel.

Presenters: Oscar Gee, P.E., Project Manager, City and County of San Francisco, Public Works; Etty Mercurio, P.E., Senior Project Manager, AECOM; Douglas Sarkkinen, P.E., M.ASCE, Principal, Otak, Inc.; Eric Zielke, P.E., M.ASCE, CEM, LEED AP, Senior Civil Engineer/Project Engineer/ Project Manager, AECOM​

The Resilience Prism: Improving Oregon’s Fuel Supply (Natural & Man-Made Disasters)
(1.0 PDH)

Friday, September 30, 2016 - 1:15 - 2:15 p.m.

Cascadia earthquake recovery will be painfully slow and exacerbated by Oregon’s insecure fuel supply chain. Six mitigation options to increase fuel supply chain resilience are examined using the Resilience Prism to show relationships between resilient critical infrastructure and disaster resistant communities. These mitigation options must be implemented through Public-Private Partnerships.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify six mitigation options to increase earthquake resilience in Oregon’s fuel supply chain.
  • Understand the relationship between resilient critical infrastructure and disaster resistant communities.
  • Understand the Resilience Prism, which integrates social, economic, and temporal elements with critical infrastructure and specifically Oregon fuel insecurities.

Presenters: Matthew Cutts, P.E., M.SAME, Project Manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District; Yumei Wang, P.E., F.ASCE, Geohazards Engineer, State of Oregon, DOGAMI

Talking About the Economic Potential of Infrastructure (Strategic Issues/Public Policy)
(1.0 PDH)

Friday, September 30, 2016 - 1:15 - 2:15 p.m.

Learn how to show the economic potential of infrastructure in your proposals and gain talking points for working with legislators and business leaders. Find out how ASCE’s latest economic report makes the business case for infrastructure investment and breaks down the impact of infrastructure to American budgets, businesses and the nation.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how to show the economic potential of infrastructure in your proposals.
  • Gain talking points for working with legislators and business leaders.
  • Find out how ASCE’s latest economic report makes the business case for infrastructure investment and breaks down the impact of infrastructure to American budgets, businesses and the nation.

Moderator: Michelle Madzelan, P.E., M.ASCE, Project Manager, Herbert, Rowland & Grubic, Inc.
Presenters: Andrew Herrmann, P.E., SECB, F.SEI, Pres.12.ASCE, Partner Emeritus, Hardesty & Hanover, LLP

Portland’s Drinking Water: Past and Present (History & Heritage)
(1.0 PDH)

Friday, September 30, 2016 - 1:15 - 2:15 p.m.

Portland’s gravity-fed, unfiltered water system was built in the 1890s. As the city grew the system expanded. Regulations, aging infrastructure, and seismic vulnerabilities contribute to contemporary challenges. Managing the water distribution from reservoirs in an Historic District on a landslide (the Washington Park reservoirs) add to these challenges.

Learning Objective:

  • Participants will learn the history of Portland’s water system, managing aging infrastructure, drinking water regulations, maintaining an unfiltered water system, building on landslides, seismic vulnerabilities, and managing a project in an Historic District.

Moderator: Gregory DiLoreto, P.E., P.L.S., D.WRE, Pres.13.ASCE, Retired
Presenters: Carmen Brown, P.E., Project Manager/Civil Engineer, AECOM; Catherine Howells, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Portland State University

Design and Construction of the Tilikum Crossing (Significant Projects)
(1.0 PDH)

Friday, September 30, 2016 - 1:15 - 2:15 p.m.

This paper will address the state-of-the art approach to the design and construction of the Tilikum Crossing, Bridge. The approach to modeling and design of this cable-stayed bridge in order to capture its nonlinear seismic behavior, will be presented with reference to the design codes and analysis methods currently in use for North American seismic design projects. A general overview of the design considerations showing the impact of construction on the design, and how the means and methods of construction impact the final dead load and geometry of the bridge.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understanding of advanced seismic design of complex structures.
  • Perspective of the impact of the method of construction on the design of cable-supported bridges.

Presenters: Hans Lund, Aff.M.ASCE, Senior Bridge Engineer, T.Y. Lin International; Kevin Almert

Collaboration of Construction Engineers & Structural Engineers (Professional Development)
(1.0 PDH)

Friday, September 30, 2016 - 1:15 - 2:15 p.m.

3D design collaboration has enabled increasingly complex architectural expressions, necessitating greater attention to constructability and holistic structural design. This session will focus on the growing collaboration interdependence of structural and construction engineers. Structural engineers will learn about construction complexities created by nuances of design geometry/sequencing and ways to decrease project cost. Construction engineers will learn about ways to identify and solve challenging structural designs, allowing for proactive collaboration efforts.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify three key areas of multidisciplinary collaboration through project-based examples.
  • Identify three reshoring design issues of cast-in-place concrete based on ACI 347.2R-05.
  • Understand three ways to decrease formwork costs created by the geometry of the design (cambers, one-time use, transfer slabs).
  • Improve understanding of load accumulation in temporary support of transfer beams and cantilevers by use of ASCE/SEI 37-14.

Presenters: Phil Jones, P.E., P.Eng., Engineering Manager, EllisDon

Sewer Rehabilitation Program and Aging Wastewater Infrastructure (Significant Projects)
(1.0 PDH)

Friday, September 30, 2016 - 4:30 - 5:30 p.m.

This two-part presentation discusses: One, a management review system that provides timely implementation of innovations for large scale sewer rehabilitation projects. Case study examples will be used. And two, advanced 3D technologies for condition assessment, design and construction when rehabilitating a large WWTP. Perspectives from owner and engineer are provided.

Learning Objective:

  • Learn an effective, timely continuous improvement process for large scale CIP projects and how to turn these changes into program standards.

Presenters: Colleen Harold, Senior Engineering Associate, City of Portland, Bureau of Environmental Services; Frederick Tack, III, P.E., M.ASCE, GHD

Leveraging Water Projects to Enhance Communities (Multi-Discipline Technical)
(1.0 PDH)

Friday, September 30, 2016 - 4:30 - 5:30 p.m.

Stormwater projects in urban areas can be designed and constructed to meet their primary engineering and environmental objectives while also providing additional community benefits. Examples in Dallas and Atlanta demonstrate how stormwater projects generated educational, recreational, transportation and economic development benefits for local communities.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify how balancing competing needs of different stakeholders shapes project outcomes (3 examples).
  • Understand where engaging the community creates opportunity to capture broader project benefits (3 examples).
  • Two lessons learned on the importance of early planning and coordination of technical, permitting, financial, and/or regulatory project elements for project success.

Presenters: Sirak Bahta, Senior Program Manager, City of Dallas; Albert Petrasek, Jr., Ph.D., P.E., M.ASCE, Retired; Cory Rayburn, CPESC, CFM,MSCE, EVN SP, Construction Project Manager, City of Atlanta

VMT Update: What Your State Should Know (Strategic Issues/Public Policy)
(1.0 PDH)

Friday, September 30, 2016 - 4:30 - 5:30 p.m.

Oregon is exploring the next frontier of transportation user fees through the “OreGo” vehicle miles traveled (VMT) pilot program. With new federal incentives to pilot VMT, additional state programs are starting up. Get an update from Oregon and find out if VMT is the right plan for your state!

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the pilot programs currently testing VMT-based user fees.
  • Share the benefits of VMT for both drivers and transportation agencies.
  • Learn how funding is currently collected for the federal Highway Trust Fund and know the ways that it will need to adjust in the future.

Moderator: Kristina L. Swallow, P.E., ENV SP, F.ASCE, ASCE 2018 President, Engineer Program Manager, City of Las Vegas
Presenters: Norma Ortega, Deputy Director of Finance/Chief Financial Officer (CFO), California Department of Transportation (Caltrans); Jim Whitty, Partner, D’Artagnan Consulting; Paula Hammond, P.E., Senior Vice President, WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff

How Clear Communication Leads to Engineering Success (Professional Development)
(1.0 PDH)

Friday, September 30, 2016 - 4:30 - 5:30 p.m.

To succeed in the civil engineering profession you need the ability to communicate with people inside and outside your organization. Learn how to organize ideas and information logically and completely, express and present ideas and information coherently, and use technology to communicate effectively and efficiently.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the characteristics of effective communication in the civil engineering profession.
  • Express and present ideas with clarity and purpose using technology to communicate effectively and efficiently.
  • Communicate with your colleagues, clients, and contractors in a professional manner, no matter how challenging the problem or situation.

Presenters: Lindsay Kammeier, EIT, A.M.ASCE, Assistant Engineer, Schaaf & Wheeler; Darcie Maffioli, P.E., M.ASCE, Project Engineer

ASCE/SEI 7: Updates to the 2016 edition (Natural & Man Made Disasters)
(1.0 PDH)

Friday, September 30, 2016 - 4:30 - 5:30 p.m.

ASCE/SEI 7 Minimum Design Loads and Associated Criteria for Buildings and Other Structures is a nationally adopted loading standard for the analysis and design of buildings and other structures. In this 90-minute session, the chair of the main committee as well as chairs of relevant subcommittees will present the updated provisions contained in the 2016 edition. An overview of changes will begin the sessions followed with more details from the Seismic and Wind chapters. Come and learn from the experts, Q&A will be included.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the overview of updates to the 2016 edition including new hazards such as tsunami and fire, as well as updates to snow and general.
  • Understand the significant updates to the seismic provisions in ASCE 7-16 including new maps, rationale for new provisions, and changes to nonstructural and nonbuilding structures.
  • Understand the significant updates to the wind provisions in ASCE 7-16 including 6 new maps, updated roof pressure coefficients, and new provisions for tanks and bins.

Presenters: Ronald Hamburger, P.E., F.SEI, Principal, Simpson, Gumpertz & Heger; Donald Scott, P.E., S.E., F.SEI, F.ASCE, Owner, PCS Structural Solutions; J.G. (Greg) Soules, P.E., S.E., P.Eng., SECB, F.SEI, F.ASCE, Principal Engineer, CB&I Inc.


 

Saturday, October 1

The New Tsunami Provisions of ASCE 7-16 (Natural & Man-Made Disasters)
(1.5 PDHs)

Saturday, October 1, 2016 - 8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

In February, 2011, a new subcommittee was formed to develop tsunami design provisions for incorporation into the ASCE 7-16 Standard Minimum Design Loads and Associated Criteria for Buildings and Other Structures. This Tsunami Loads and Effects Subcommittee (TLESC) as spent four and a half years developing comprehensive tsunami design provisions that have been approved for inclusion as Chapter 6, Tsunami Loads and Effects, in ASCE 7-16.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the basis of design for the ASCE 7-16 Tsunami Loads and Effects chapter.
  • Understand the new Tsunami Design Zone maps and how to determine inundation depth and flow velocities at the site.
  • Learn how to determine the various tsunami structural loadings and how to apply these loadings to the design of structural systems and components.

Presenters: Gary Chock, S.E., D.CE, F.SEI, Dist.M.ASCE, President, Martin and Chock, Inc.; Yong Wei, A.M.ASCE

Engaging Millennial Engineers through Mentoring (Professional Development)
(1.5 PDHs)

Saturday, October 1, 2016 - 8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

The presentation will identify general interests and needs of the changing workforce, and discuss examples of strategies to engage young level employees with mentoring programs, flexible work environments, and developing a culture of progressive responsibility. Participants will leave with ideas on how to apply these strategies within their organizations.

Learning Objectives:

  • Define the “Millennial” as it relates to the engineering profession and why mentoring is key to development for the Millennial Workforce and to learn from mistakes made on design and construction projects to create a stronger mentoring relationship.
  • Discuss what existing and new mentoring programs can be used to engage the younger workforce in your organization.
  • Learn methods for facilitating a comfortable, safe, and diverse work environment and how to assign appropriate responsibilities for junior-level employees.
  • Gain an understanding on how to assign appropriate responsibilities for junior-level employees.

Presenters: Laura Farthing, P.E., M.ASCE, Senior Engineer, Eugene Water & Electric Board; Christopher Hanna, P.E., M.ASCE, T&M Associates; Vatsal Shah, P.E., M.ASCE, Engineer

Humanitarian Opportunities in Civil Engineering (Multi-Discipline Technical)
(1.5 PDHs)

Saturday, October 1, 2016 - 8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

Humanitarian Response to Nepal Earthquakes – This presentation will summarize the engineering response to recovery efforts from the Nepal earthquake of 2015. Lessons learned will be shared with the audience as well as opportunities for future engagement by the engineering community. Assisting Underserved Communities with Pro Bono Engineering Services - The newly formed Community Engineering Corps will be presented with examples of how engineering services are offered to communities who otherwise would be unable to access engineering services.

Learning Objectives:

  • Demonstrate specific ways that engineers can prepare for and respond to natural disasters.
  • How individual members can prepare for future response, including Technical, Organizational, Risk Management, and Logistical.
  • Show the opportunities available to attendees to help communities that would otherwise be unable to access engineering services.
  • Show the methodology that allows the Community Engineering Corps to help communities with engineering services.

Presenter: Cathy Leslie, P.E., F.ASCE, Executive Director, EWB-USA

Transforming Transportation - Automated and Connected Vehicles (State of the Industry/Profession)

Saturday, October 1, 2016 - 8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

As automated vehicle technology matures, automobiles begin to listen, think, act and connect. This change is a paradigm shift in automobile design, vehicle ownership, travel behavior, infrastructure design, and traffic operations. The future of transportation will be redefined by technologies that allow data sharing among vehicles, pedestrians, bicyclists and the infrastructure.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the differences between vehicle automation, autonomous vehicles, and connected vehicles, and how those technologies will transform our vehicles and our travel.
  • Discover how industry and government agencies are preparing for and adapting to this future, including the impacts of big data.
  • Explain how an automated vehicle fleet will impact transportation infrastructures, traffic engineering practices, and transit systems.
  • Understand the challenges and constraints transportation engineering practitioners may face during this transformation process as well as the benefits of innovation and technology such as multi-car synchronization.

Presenters: Blaine D. Leonard, P.E., D.GE, Pres.10.ASCE, Chair of AASHTO Connected Vehicle Working Group; Wei Zhu, P.E., T.E., P.M.P., Chair of ASCE OC Continuing Education Committee 2014-2015

Columbia River History and Landmarks (History & Heritage)
(1.5 PDHs)

Saturday, October 1, 2016 - 8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

This session will feature: “Early Exploration and Mapping of the Columbia River,” “Bonneville and The Dalles Dams: Civil Engineering Landmarks on the Lower Columbia River,” “History of the Columbia River Treaty,” and “Strange Bedfellows: Woody Guthrie, the Bonneville Power Administration, and the ‘Biggest Thing That Man Has Ever Done’.”

Learning objectives:

  • Review the early mapping of the Columbia River.
  • Understand the unique civil engineering in National Landmark dams.
  • Summarize the Columbia River treaty and possible changes, and see how songs sold acceptance of Columbia River power.

Moderator: Jerry Rogers, Ph.D., P.E., D.WRE, Dist.M.ASCE, Retired Professor Emeritus – University of Houston
Presenters: James Barton, P.E., D.WRE, Retired; Jeff Bradley, Ph.D, P.E., D.WRE, President, WEST Consultants, Inc; David Gilbert; Reuben F. Hull, Jr., P.E., M.ASCE, PMP, Design Project Manager M+W Group

ASCE Celebrates 100 Years

Saturday, October 1, 2016 - 8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

The Illinois Section Celebrating 100 years in Americas Engineering Hub, The Michigan Section will present a Centennial Celebration video, The Capital Section is covering Engineering the Nation’s Capital, A Century of Innovation & Promise for the Future and The Utah Section published an e-Book about significant projects.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discover the rich history and heritage of four ASCE Sections.
  • Learn about the early years of the American Society of Civil Engineers, and the members that participated 100 years ago.
  • Understand the effort and challenges that are part of a Section-wide anniversary celebratio

Moderator: Edward McGuire, P.E., F.ASCE, Assistant Director, City of Henderson
Presenters: Melinda Bacon, P.E., M.ASCE, Project Engineer, SME-USA; Victor Crawford, P.E., M.ASCE, Vcec, LLC.; Stanley L. Klemetson, Ph.D., P.E., M.ASCE, Associate Dean of Technology and Computing, University of Missouri-Rolla; John Lazzara, P.E., M.ASCE, HDR, Inc.

Comparing Portland Agencies’ Seismic Studies (Natural & Man-Made Disasters)
(1.5 PDHs)

Saturday, October 1, 2016 - 9:45 - 11:15 a.m.

In light of the mounting data indicating a greater seismic hazard in the Pacific Northwest than previously understood, The Portland Water Bureau and The Port of Portland have each initiated seismic studies of their crucial assets. This presentation compares and contrasts the two agencies' approaches.

Learning Objectives:

  • Be able to discuss the economic and community impacts of large-scale seismic events
  • Identify three mitigation strategies for assets
  • Identify what Portland and other cities on the West Coast are doing to make their lifelines more resilient

Presenters: David Peters, P.E., M.ASCE, Principal Engineer, City of Portland Water Bureau; Tom Wharton

ASCE’s Grand Challenge: 50% by 2025 (Strategic Issues/Public Policy)
(1.5 PDHs)

Saturday, October 1, 2016 - 9:45 - 11:15 a.m.

During this presentation, attendees will discover tools and best practices to participate in the ASCE Grand Challenge. With guidance from members of Industry Leaders Council, attendees will engage and work in groups to practice rethinking project delivery methods that can reduce life cycle costs through innovation, life cycle cost assessments, performance-based standards, and resiliency.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will learn about the goals and objectives of the ASCE Grand Challenge. They will understand how, as individuals, they can help work towards closing the funding gap of America’s infrastructure.
  • Participants will learn strategies to help incorporate the challenge’s four key pillars (innovation, lifecycle cost assessments, performance-based standards, resiliency) into real-world projects.
  • Participants will have the unique opportunity to collaborate in a format that brings different sectors, age groups, backgrounds, and geographic locations together to address common strategies for adapting elements of the ASCE Grand Challenge.

Moderator: Amy Kennedy, Senior Account Manager, PRR
Presenters: Anthony S. Bartolomeo, P.E., F.ASCE, President & CEO, Pennoni Associates, Inc.; Gerald Buckwalter, A.M.ASCE, Directory of Strategy, Northrop Grumman; Terry Neimeyer, P.E., ENV SP, BCEE, F.ASCE, CEO & Chairman, KCI Technologies, Inc.

Urban Design and Dewatering Deformation in Seattle (Significant Projects)
(1.5 PDHs)

Saturday, October 1, 2016 - 9:45 - 11:15 a.m.

Presentation on SR-99 Bored Tunnel Project challenges: Reaching agreement on urban design and maintaining the design during construction monitoring data indicated that approximately 1 inch of settlement occurred near a deep tunnel access shaft. The settlement is related to lowering of the deep glacial soil aquifer groundwater table.

Learning Objectives:

  • Effect of deep dewatering in very dense soils and large-scale effects of dewatering.
  • How to reach agreement and implement urban designs.
  • Managing stakeholder concerns.

Presenters: Lesley Bain; Susan Everett, P.E., M.ASCE, Program Design Manager, Washington State Department of Transportation; David Sowers, P.E., Deputy Program Administrator, Washington State Department of Transportation

The Observational Method and Climate Change Design (State of Industry/Profession)
(1.5 PDHs)

Saturday, October 1, 2016 - 9:45 - 11:15 a.m.

The Observational Method applied to climate change design is based on the most probable climate condition(s) (MPCC) rather than the most unfavorable. The purpose of the session proposed herein is to provide guidance and methodologies to determine the MPCC and the most unfavorable conceivable deviations from the MPCC.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the justification to apply the observational method (OM) to climate change project design (CCPD).
  • Present the engineers’ dilemma when applying the OM to CCPD.
  • Identify available resources necessary to apply the OM to CCPD.

Presenters: Bilal Ayyub, Ph.D., P.E., F.ASCE, Professor, University of Maryland; Ana Barros, Ph.D., P.E., M.ASCE, Professor, Duke University; Ted Vinson, Ph.D., P.E., M.ASCE, Professor, Oregon State University; Dan Walker, Ph.D., A.M.ASCE

How You Can Be A More TRUST-WORTHY Leader (Professional Development)
(1.5 PDHs)

Saturday, October 1, 2016 - 9:45 - 11:15 a.m.

Using multiple presenters from the ASCE Leader Development staff, this session will explain, demonstrate, and offer participatory, interactive exercises for Leaders at all levels to further their knowledge of themselves (Leaders know self), their followers (Leaders know their followers), and the situation (Leaders know the situation). Through these exercises, each will grow in understanding how trust is the foundation to effective leadership. Each will learn and practice techniques offered to become a more Trust—Worthy leader.

Learning Objectives:

  • Define what “trust” is
  • Explain to a friend why trust leads to better relationships, reputation, revenue, and session results.
  • Explain to a friend the meaning of each of the Eight Pillars of Trust.
  • Use at least three of the Eight Pillars to become more “trust-worthy”.

Presenters: James O’Brien, Jr., P.E., M.ASCE, Managing Director, Leader Development, ASCE

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